Alliant Techsystems wins Iraqi Air Force Cessna 208 support contract

Alliant Techsystems Inc. has been awarded a contract modification for the exercise of option year two for contractor logistic support for the Iraqi Air Force’s Cessna 208 fleet and the Cessna 172/208 trainer fleet.

This contract, worth over $28 million, is 100 percent foreign military sales (FMS) to Iraq and was awarded by the U.S. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC) located in Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma.

The work will be performed in Iraq, with an expected completion date of Dec. 31, 2018.

AC-208 Combat Caravan

The AC-208 Combat Caravan is a light attack combat aircraft manufactured by the U.S.-based aerospace and defence company Alliant Techsystems (ATK), now Orbital ATK. It is derived from the Cessna 208 Grand Caravan aircraft.

The Cessna 208 Caravan is a passenger and utility aircraft developed in the 1980s. ATK developed a combat variant of the Cessna 208 by incorporating intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) features.

The AC-208 Combat Caravan is armed with Hellfire missiles. Other upgrades over the basic Cessna Grand Caravan include an electro-optical targeting system with an integrated laser designator, air-to-ground and air-to-air data link and self-protection equipment.

Cessna 172 Skyhawk

Cessna 172 Skyhawk is an American four-seat, single-engine, high wing, fixed-wing aircraft made by the Cessna Aircraft Company. First flown in 1955, more 172s have been built than any other aircraft.

Measured by its longevity and popularity, the Cessna 172 is the most successful aircraft in history. Cessna delivered the first production model in 1956 and as of 2015, the company and its partners had built more than 44,000. The aircraft remains in production today.

Iraqi Air Force Cessna 172
KIRKUK REGIONAL AIR BASE, IRAQ — Capt. Jamie Riddle, 52nd Expeditionary Flying Training Squadron Instructor Pilot, and Lt. “Joseph,” Iraqi Air Force Training Pilot, perform a perfect landing in their Cessna 172 after surpassing 2,000 flying hours for the 52 EFTS and the IqAF. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman First Class Randi Flaugh)



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