BMT to Offer the Caimen 90 Landing Craft for Australian Army’s Land 8710 Program

BMT will offer its Caimen 90 Landing Craft for the Australian Army’s Land 8710 Phase 1 program, the company announced on Oct. 15.

The Caimen 90 was designed by BMT and is able to operate at high speeds with heavy payloads, allowing faster amphibious offload from host ship compared with slower, more conventional landing craft.

“BMT is offered world leading capability in landing craft vessels to the Australian Army with the Caimen 90,” BMT Defence and Security Managing Director, Peter Behrendt said.

“A variant of this vessel is already being built internationally, which shows it is a proven hull form and design. The Caimen 90 represents a significant improvement on speed performance from previous landing craft vessels and is capable of traveling at up to 30 knots,” Mr Behrendt said.

“Additionally, features such as a tri-bow aluminum monohull and a bow and stern ramp, will allow for roll-on, roll-off capability, a key requirement for a modern landing craft. We are delighted to be able to offer this vessel to Australia,” he added.

Land 8710 Phase 1 is the program to replace the Australian Army’s Mark 8 Landing Craft.

Caimen 90

BMT’s CAIMEN-90 Fast is a highly capable tri-bow fast landing craft designed by BMT Defence Services and BMT Nigel Gee which addressed many design and safety challenges for lightweight, fast landing craft and reduced host ship vulnerability.

The vessel is able to operate at high speeds with heavy payloads, allowing faster amphibious offload from a host ship compared with slower, more conventional landing craft.

Through speed improvements, delivery and offload of similar quantities of vehicle stores and personnel can be achieved within the same timeframe and the specially designed hull form allows for reduced host ship vulnerability by launching landing craft further offshore and maintaining flexibility in stand-off distance.

The tri-bow monohull is constructed from aluminium and has been extensively model tested, with the capability of the design being proven not only in terms of speed but also seakeeping and manoeuvrability.

Specifications:

Dimensions: Length of 30 m, a beam of 7.7 m, a draught of 1.5 m and a displacement of 203 tonnes.
Payload: Deck area of 90 m2 and a max capacity of 90 tonnes. Anticipated payloads of one main battle tank or four all-terrain vehicles, plus additional design payloads.
Machinery: Three main diesel engines driving three waterjet propulsors.
Performance: Speed (laden) of 22 knots, speed (unladen) of 40 knots and a range of 500+ nm.



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