Halifax Shipyard Commences Initial Builder’s Sea Trials for Future HMCS Harry DeWolf

Halifax Shipyard has commenced initial builder’s sea trials for Royal Canadian Navy (RCN)’s lead Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS), the future HMCS Harry DeWolf (AOPV 430).

The lead AOPS departed Halifax Shipyard at 0945 hours on Nov. 27 and, using its diesel-electric engines, moved to the Bedford Basin to start initial builder’s sea trails associated with anchor handling, the integrated bridge and navigation system (IBNS), fin stabilizers, Multi-Role Rescue Boat (MRRB) launch and recovery, and communication systems.

Initial builder’s sea trials will continue over the next few weeks and will be followed by formal sea trials and acceptance by the Royal Canadian Navy. This will span into the first quarter of 2020.

At 103 metres and 6,615 tonnes, the future HMCS Harry DeWolf is the largest Royal Canadian Navy ship built in Canada in 50 years.

There are currently four AOPS under construction at Halifax Shipyard, including the future HMCS Harry DeWolf. The future HMCS Margaret Brooke was launched on November 10, 2019, and is currently pier side where work continues to prepare the ship for sea trials and handover to the Royal Canadian Navy late next year.

Inside Halifax Shipyard’s facilities, the Royal Canadian Navy’s third and fourth AOPS, the future HMCS Max Bernays and the future HMCS William Hall, are under construction. The first two major sections of the future HMCS Max Bernays are scheduled to be moved outside in spring 2020.

Over the next few decades, Halifax Shipyard will build six AOPS for the Royal Canadian Navy, two AOPS for the Canadian Coast Guard, and 15 Canadian Surface Combatants for the Royal Canadian Navy, as part of Canada’s National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS).

Halifax Shipyard is also continuing its legacy as the Halifax-class In-Service Support Centre of Excellence, with HMCS Charlottetown currently in the graving dock for an extensive docking work period.



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