Russian Su-25 Attack Jet Shot Down in Syria’s Idlib Province

A Russian Aerospace Force Sukhoi Su-25 “Frogfoot” attack aircraft was shot down by rebels usind a man-portable air defense system (MANPADS) in Syria’s Idlib province on Feb. 3, Saturday, the Russian Defense Ministry said.

The statement added that the pilot ejected but was killed later by the terrorists (rebels).

“On 3 February 2018, a Russian fighter jet Su-25 crashed when flying over the Idlib de-escalation zone. The pilot was able to report ejection from an area controlled by Jabhat al-Nusra militants (the terrorist group banned in Russia),” the defense ministry said. “The pilot was killed while fighting against terrorists.”

“According to preliminary information, the jet was brought down with a portable anti-aircraft missile system,” it added.

“The Russian center for reconciliation of warring sides in Syria alongside the Turkish side, responsible for the Idlib de-escalation zone, are taking steps to retrieve the Russian pilot’s body,” the ministry said.

Earlier reports said that Syrian governmental forces were fighting against Jabhat al-Nusra units in the Idlib province.

In accordance with an agreement by Russia, Iran and Turkey – the guarantors of the Syrian ceasefire – de-escalation zones were set up in Syria in May 2017. De-escalation zones include the Idlib Province, some parts of its neighboring areas in the Latakia, Hama and Aleppo Provinces north of the city of Homs, Eastern Ghouta, as well as the Daraa and al-Quneitra Provinces in southern Syria.

Sukhoi Su-25 Grach

Sukhoi Su-25 Grach (Russian: Грач (rook); NATO reporting name: Frogfoot) is a single-seat, twin-engine jet aircraft developed in the Soviet Union by Sukhoi.

It was designed to provide close air support (CAS) for the Soviet Ground Forces.

The first prototype made its maiden flight on 22 February 1975. After testing, the aircraft went into series production in 1978 at Tbilisi in the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic.

Su-25s are in service with Russia, other CIS states, and export customers.



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