Saab receives NLAW order from Finnish Defence Forces

Saab has received an order from the Finnish Defence Forces for the Next generation Light Anti-Tank Weapon system (NLAW).

According to the company statement, the deliveries for the order will take place during this year.

The Finnish Defence Forces have been a user of the NLAW weapon system since 2007, then becoming the second export customer of the system. This order is a call-up of an option as part of a previous contract with the customer, announced in 2015, regarding delivery of NLAW weapon systems.

“The interest for our NLAW system has increased significantly in recent years. This order is a strong proof of this and we look forward to deliver a high capability weapon system to the Finnish Defence Forces. NLAW provides the single soldier with a true anti-tank capability, previously not available on the battlefield”, says Görgen Johansson, head of Saab´s business area Dynamics”

During the recently held military exercise Aurora 17, in Sweden, the NLAW system was used by both Swedish and Finnish forces.

“There is a long-lasting commercial relationship between Saab and the Finnish Defence Forces. This call-up of an option from the 2015 contract demonstrates high trust and confidence from the Finnish Defence Forces towards the NLAW system”, says Anders Gardberg, head of Saab in Finland.

Saab NLAW

The Main Battle Tank and Light Anti-tank Weapon (MBT LAW), also known as the NLAW, is a joint British and Swedish short-range fire-and-forget anti-tank missile system.

Designed for use by infantry, the MBT LAW is shoulder fired, disposable and attacks the tank from above. This makes it the most effective anti-tank weapon for dismounted light forces operating in any environment, including built-up areas.

The weapon system combines the simplicity of light anti-armour weapon with the advantages of heavy, crew-operated guided missile system.

With NLAW, a single soldier can destroy a heavily protected modern Main Battle Tank (MBT) with only one shot at a range from 20 to 800 metres.

It is currently in use with the military forces of the United Kingdom, Finland, Luxembourg, and Sweden.



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