Singapore Navy Inaugurates Maritime Security and Response Flotilla

Chief of Navy Rear-Admiral Aaron Beng officiated at the inauguration ceremony of the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)’s Maritime and Security Response Flotilla (MSRF) at RSS Singapura – Changi Naval Base this morning.

The new flotilla will add capacity and build capabilities to protect Singapore’s territorial waters and respond to expanded maritime security threats. The MSRF will be equipped with new purpose-built ships. As a start, the flotilla will operate four Sentinel-class Maritime Security and Response Vessels (MSRVs) and two Maritime Security and Response Tugboats (MSRTs) to enable more calibrated responses.

Commander of the MSRF, Lieutenant Colonel Lee Jun Meng, said, “The MSRF will strengthen Singapore’s ability to deal with maritime security threats that have grown in scale and complexity through the years. The additional capabilities will provide us with more flexibility and a wider range of responses, and allow us to be deployed for greater persistence to safeguard and protect Singapore’s territorial waters.”

Also present at the inauguration ceremony were senior RSN officers and representatives from other national maritime agencies.

RSN Maritime and Security Response Flotilla (MSRF)

Maritime and Security Response Flotilla (MSRF) is part of Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)’s restructured Maritime Security Command.

The MSRF will be responsible to develop and operate calibrated capabilities to provide the Singapore government and Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) with more options to respond to maritime incidents. The capabilities raised by the MSRF will provide flexibility to meet the increased demands and a wider scope of maritime security operations, and offer greater persistence to protect Singapore’s territorial waters. The MSRF will form an important part of the restructured Maritime Security Command.

The MSRF will operate new purpose-built vessels from 2026. As a start, the flotilla will operate four Sentinel-class Maritime Security and Response Vessels (MSRVs). It will also operate two Maritime Security and Response Tugboats (MSRTs). In line with other international maritime security agencies, these vessels will all bear red “racing” stripes on their bow.

Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)’s Maritime and Security Response Flotilla (MSRF)

Sentinel-class Maritime Security and Response Vessels

Four ex-Fearless class patrol vessels – MSRV Sentinel (55), MSRV Guardian (56), MSRV Protector (57) and MSRV Bastion (58) – have been refurbished as the Sentinel-class MSRVs. MSRV Sentinel and MSRV Guardian will now enter into operational service, while MSRV Protector and MSRV Bastion will be refurbished and operationalized in the coming months.

In addition to refitting the vessels to extend their operational lifespan, the Sentinel-class MSRVs will be installed with a range of calibrated capabilities. This includes enhanced communications equipment, improved visual and audio warning systems, installation of a fender system and modular ballistics protection.

Maritime Security and Response Tugboats

Two tugboats will join the MSRF under a long-lease arrangement. As dedicated tugboats, they will enable the RSN to better respond to and assist incidents at sea, as well as support base operations.

Composite image of Sentinel-class Maritime Security and Response Vessel MSRV Guardian (56) and a Maritime Security and Response Tugboat (MSRT) operated by Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)’s Maritime and Security Response Flotilla (MSRF).

Future Purpose-built Vessels

The future purpose-built vessels are still in the early stages of concept design. They are expected to be larger than the Sentinel-class MSRVs and have longer endurance to operate at sea for up to a few weeks. Additionally, these vessels will be designed for lean manning with modular capabilities.

Singapore’s Maritime Security Task Force (MSTF) will acquire new purpose-built platforms to better deal with maritime threats like sea robberies and intrusions into country’s territorial waters.



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