U.S. Air Force’s Modified Bombardier Global Fleet Clocks 100,000 Flight Hours

Bombardier’s Global aircraft platform has achieved a significant in-service milestone with the U.S. Air Force in special-mission configuration.

A fleet of four modified Global aircraft, designated E-11A, has collectively flown an impressive 100,000 hours since entering service. These aircraft are an integral part of the Air Force’s Battlefield Airborne Communications Node (BACN) program, an airborne communications relay that extends communication ranges, bridges between radio frequencies and “translates” among incompatible communications systems.

Over the course of their mission, BACN aircraft have regularly flown over 18 hours a day for months at a time, demonstrating the excellent dispatch reliability of the Global platform.

“We are extremely proud of the outstanding reliability and performance of the Global aircraft platform as part of this elite assignment,” said Steve Patrick, Vice President, Bombardier Specialized Aircraft. “This 100,000-flight-hour milestone is a testament to the aircraft’ performance and endurance, clearly demonstrating that the Global platform excels in demanding situations.”

Starting with one Global Express aircraft in 2007, the BACN fleet today also includes two Global Express XRS variants and one Global 6000 aircraft. The four jets are known in the Air Force as the E-11A.

Bombardier’s Specialized Aircraft team, based in Wichita, Kansas, carried out the modifications of all four jets, and the team continues to provide in-service support and upgrades to the aircraft.

The Global 6000 aircraft, with an outstanding range of 6,000 nautical miles, is recognized for its ability to fly intercontinental ranges without refueling stops, and also for its excellent dispatch reliability. The aircraft also has the most available electrical power in its category for peace of mind on long missions, while the Bombardier Vision flight deck offers a head-up display with enhanced and synthetic vision.



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