U.S. State Department Approves Sale of JCREW Systems to Australia

The U.S. State Department has approved a possible Foreign Military Sale of up to eight hundred fifty (850) Joint Counter Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Increment 1 Block 1 (JCREW I1B1) Systems and related equipment to Australia for an estimated cost of $245 million.

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on Nov. 20.

The Government of Australia has requested to buy up to eight hundred fifty (850) Joint Counter Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Increment 1 Block 1 (JCREW I1B1) Systems (533 vehicle-mounted and 317 dismounted); spare and repair parts; support and test equipment; technical exchanges, publications and technical documentation; support equipment; engineering change proposals; classified software/loadsets; training; U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistics support.

The proposed sale will provide Australia increased force protection from Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device (RCIED) threats for its defense forces and vehicles. Australia is interested in procuring the dismounted and mounted variants that have a modular, open architecture and are upgradeable in order to maintain capability against evolving global threats.

The principal contractor will be Northrop Grumman Corporation, San Diego, California.

Northrop Grumman’s Joint Counter Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare, or JCREW, system is a software-programmable jammer that provides protection from device-triggered IEDs. The units are available in both a wearable, backpack design and a mounted/fixed-site version to protect warfighters on foot, in vehicles, and in permanent structures.



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