USS Emory S. Land Makes First Visit to Kure, Japan

The U.S. Navy Emory S. Land-class submarine tender USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) arrived in Kure, Jan. 22, for a port visit.

This is Land’s first visit to the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force base in Kure. The ship last visited Japan in May 2018.

“It’s great to be back in Japan,” said Capt. Michael Luckett, Land’s commanding officer. “The Japanese people have always been such gracious and hospitable hosts when I’ve visited in the past. I’m excited for the crew to get an opportunity to experience this as well.”

While in Kure, Land’s officers and crew will join with members of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force for professional military engagements. Crewmembers from Land will also have an opportunity to engage with the community by participating in community service events.

Since beginning the current deployment in August, Land has visited seven countries, conducting training and engaging in mutually beneficial meetings and subject matter expert exchanges with U.S. partners.

“What we’re doing as a crew, I believe, is crucial to sustaining and building upon the relationship we have with our partners,” Luckett said. “The alliance between the U.S. and Japan is very valuable, and we’re honored to have a chance to represent the U.S. during this visit.”

Land is one of just two submarine tenders in the U.S. Navy. Land is capable of providing repair services and supplies to U.S. and partner country submarines anywhere in the world.

Land’s visit to Japan continues the U.S. Navy’s ongoing commitment to theater security cooperation and friendship with partner navies.

Guam is home to the U.S. Navy’s only submarine tenders, USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) and USS Frank Cable (AS 40), as well as four Los Angeles-class attack submarines. The submarine tenders provide maintenance, hotel services and logistical support to submarines and surface ships in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. The submarines and tenders are maintained as part of the U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed naval force and are readily capable of meeting global operational requirements.



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